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PrEP

About PrEP
  • PrEP, short for pre-exposure prophylaxis, is when people at very high risk for HIV take HIV medicines daily to lower their chances of getting infected. 
  • When taken as prescribed, PrEP has shown to be up to 92% effective in preventing sexual transmission HIV infection in high-risk individuals. It is more than 70% effective in injection drug users.
  • PrEP works by preventing HIV from establishing a permanent infection in the body.
  • Combining additional strategies, like condom use, with PrEP can reduce the risk of HIV transmission even further. If used the right way every time you have sex, condoms are highly effective in preventing HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Is PrEP for me?

Federal guidelines recommend that PrEP be considered for the following people: 
  • People who are HIV-negative and in an ongoing sexual relationship with an HIV-positive partner.
  • People who have injected drugs in the past 6 months and have shared needles or works or been in drug treatment in the past 6 months.
  • Anyone who isn’t in a mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who recently tested HIV-negative and is...
    • A gay or bisexual man who has had anal sex without a condom or been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the past 6 months, or
    • A heterosexual man or woman who does not regularly use condoms during sex with partners of unknown HIV status who are at substantial risk of HIV infection (for example, people who inject drugs or women who have bisexual male partners)
How to get PrEP at Student Health Services

PrEP is available at
Student Health Services. Cost will vary depending on whether or not you have the Student Health Insurance Plan (SHIP). 

The process for initiating PrEP can take one month or more from the first visit. The process includes the following:
    • Make an appointment for an initial visit with your Primary Care Provider (PCP) at Student Health Services
    • Meet with a Health Educator from Health Promotion Services to discuss risk reduction
    • Meet with SKAGGS School of Pharmacy Pharmacist to discuss the medication itself
    • Complete laboratory tests ordered by your PCP 
    • Make an appointment for a follow-up with your PCP